THE AUTOGRAPH BLOG

Great Collections of Today: The Pedro Corrêa do Lago Autograph Collection

Wolfgang Mozart Autograph Letter 1778 (Correa do Lago Collection) Pedro Corrêa do Lago of Brazil has amassed the largest private autograph collection in the world. Autograph collectors typically focus on finding pieces within a specific niche. Corrêa do Lago's collection stands out due to the broad array of autographs he...

Farewell to Aldo Mancusi - Founder of the Enrico Caruso Museum of America

Our dear friend Aldo Mancusi passed away this May at 92 years old. While the world will miss him greatly, we are fortunate enough to be left with his lasting legacy, the Enrico Caruso Museum of America. In honor of our beloved Aldo, we want to reflect on his life...

University of Michigan Discovers Galileo Manuscript is a Forgery

The University of Michigan was devastated to find out that one of its most famous artifacts turned out to be a forgery. In their possession since 1938, the manuscript was supposed to have been authenticated many years before. The library’s curators were alerted after historian Nick Wilding reported his concerns about the artifact being a fake. 

Gustav Mahler Symphony 2 "Resurrection": The Gilbert Kaplan Story

Music has touched the hearts and lives of people since its beginnings. It's a way to explore the most profound feelings and mysteries of the human experience and bring people together. Almost everyone has a story or two regarding how a particular piece of music touched their soul at one...

The Schubertiade Music Festival Continues to Create Community

Over two centuries since the first Schubertiades were first held, the festivals continue to bring people together and create a community of like-minded people. From small, intimate gatherings to massive, world-famous celebrations, one thing all Schubertiades have in common is connecting lovers of chamber music and lieder-singing.  "Schubertiade" (1868) by...

The Conried Met: 1903-1906

A NEW MANAGER From 1891 to 1903, Maurice Grau had been an urbane and knowledgeable steward for the Metropolitan’s transformation into an international opera house. The style of Heinrich Conried, his successor in the manager’s office, could not have been more different. Grau had made the Met a congenial home...

Autograph Collectors of the Past: Louis Koch

Autograph collectors are what keeps the hobby alive, and sometimes their collections become so vast and important, that they can make a mark in history as keepers of valuable historical documents and photos. Louis Koch (1862-1932) was a true Renaissance man with a profound appreciation for beauty in any form....

Brünnhilde and “Holde Aida”: The Metropolitan Opera's German Seasons, 1884-1891

1890-91 The German company. Left and right of the table are Walter Damrosch and Anton Seidl   OPERA IN THE RED   The Metropolitan’s opening season, 1883-84, ended deeply in debt. Henry Abbey’s all-star Italian opera company had been enormously costly. And the impresario had not taken into account the...

Frederic Chopin: The Funeral March Story

THE SONATA   Chopin at the house of Prince Radzivill in Posen Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, also known as Chopin Funeral March (which is actually only a part of this sonata), was composed between the years 1837 and 1839. The work was completed...

Giacomo Puccini and the World Premiere of La Bohème

INTRODUCTION  According to Operabase, Giacomo Puccini’s La bohème is not only the composer’s most performed opera but it is also amongst the most often produced works of the entire repertoire only slightly behind such giants as Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, Verdi’s La Traviata and Bizet’s Carmen. However, La bohème’s grand scale...

Maria Callas Debut at The Metropolitan Opera

Maria Callas during the curtain call after her debut as Norma at the Met, 1956 October 29, 1956. It remains as vivid to me now as it was then, when I was there, sixty-five years ago. Maria Callas was at last making her eagerly awaited debut on the stage of...

Vaslav Nijinsky and Diaghilev: The Famous Paris Debut 1909

Since the time of the gods and pharaohs, dance has had a crucial role in history, where rhythmic movements gave free rein to the exhibition of feelings and thoughts through the use of the body as an instrument of expression, accompanied by iconic costumes as a way of showing respect...

Marie Antoinette Autograph Letters: X-Rays Analysis Reveal Content of Her Censored Writings

Using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, researches uncovered previously unknown text from Marie Antoinette´s letters sent to her lover, the Swedish count Axel von Fersen. 

The Birth of the Metropolitan Opera of New York: Opening Night

THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC In 1883, the year the Met opened, New Yorkers were used to attending opera in another capacious lyric theater and enjoying performances given by a starry opera company. The Academy of Music on 14th Street boasted a flamboyant impresario, Colonel James H. Mapleson, and a roster...

Gustav Mahler vs Arturo Toscanini at the Metropolitan Opera

In 1907, Gustav Mahler was reigning supreme as conductor of the New York Met Opera. Then, in 1908, the Italian Arturo Toscanini arrived. The clash between these two enigmatic giants of the music world was inevitable and their polar opposite styles have become the stuff of legends. The Russian-American pianist...

Opera Singers Who Died in the Holocaust

On 30 January 1933, life changed for every German citizen and for some, very dangerously indeed. Adolf Hitler's Nazi Party was declared the only legal political entity in Germany, and they began to put their plans in place for segregating everyone who did not fit their "Aryan" ideal. These people...

Book "The Performances of Richard Strauss Operas in the 20th Century" - In 2 Volumes

During a hot weekend in August 1973 I sat on my terrace and lookedthrough old magazines not yet read and found an article which stated that one has to choose his hobby for the time after retiring at the latest at the age of forty, otherwise it will not work....

Farinelli in Madrid...and an Autograph Document

The Bourbon King, Philip V, wasn't born a Spanish royal at all. He was the younger son of Louis, The Grand Dauphin, who was heir apparent to the French throne, and as he had older brothers who were directly in line, there was little expectation that he would ever rule...

The Arturo Toscanini Tours and His Wider Repertoire

The Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini was one of the most acclaimed musical figures of the late 19th century, and through to the mid 20th century. His career included spells as director of the Teatro alla Scala in Milan, and of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra and the NBC Symphony Orchestra...

Opera Memorabilia: Tosca - The Tumultuous Premiere of a Puccini Classic

Some operas seem destined to take a firm place in the repertoire from their premiere, and Tosca can certainly be said to be one of these. Tosca opera memorabilia is widely sought-after, and a new production is something that is always guaranteed to sell well, or if cast with international...

Richard Strauss Memorabilia: Lost Photo Found - Strauss and Vienna 1929

Two years ago while antique shopping in Purcellville, Virginia, I discovered a black lacquered frame with glass, sitting on the floor of a dingy consignment shop. Its only identifying mark at the time was a raised stamp near the bottom right, Herlango, which was a photograph company of Austria in...

Enrico Caruso: The New York Years

From the golden age of opera in the early years of the twentieth century, few voices define their era better than that of Enrico Caruso. One of the first great star tenors in a time that otherwise worshiped coloratura sopranos and their music, Caruso's life - a breath-taking rise from...

Paris Sky Lavishly Sparkles After Bastille Day 2020

Bastille Day in Covid-19 stricken France was celebrated with solemnity in a public free concert in Champs-de-Mars, home to the Eiffel Tower. Usually reputed for its grand-style panache, French authorities imposed scaled down grandeur through social distancing and strict sanitary measures in an atmosphere of social unrest. Televised evening concert...

Rediscovery of “long-lost” Granados opera

Spanish composer Enrique Granados is universally hailed, alongside Isaac Albeniz, as one of the most significant and talented composers to come out of the Iberic Peninsula in the second half of the Nineteenth century. Contrary to his slightly older colleague, Granados’ works are, although highly revered, rarely performed and a...

Showing items 1-24 of 29.

Tamino Autographs @2021 - All rights reserved.


Showing items 1-24 of 29.

Tamino Autographs @2021 - All rights reserved.